Undergraduate Program

General Information
Bachelor of Arts Requirements
Minor Requirements
Honors Track
Opportunities for practical experience
Funding
Careers in Anthropology & Preparation for Advanced Studies
Undergraduate Mentoring Program
Undergraduate Anthropology Club
Lambda Alpha Honor Society

General Information

The Department of Anthropology at University of Hawai'i at Mānoa welcomes students interested in majoring or minoring in anthropology. This page provides helpful information for such students as well as those who have already declared majors or minors in the undergraduate program in anthropology at UH.

Applying. To apply for undergraduate study at UH, contact the UH Admissions and Records Office.

Declaring. For currently enrolled UHM students to declare a major in anthropology, students will need to fill out a 'declaration of major' form and schedule a meeting with the anthropology undergraduate advisor. Students pursuing a minor in anthropology should schedule a meeting with the anthropology undergraduate advisor prior to taking courses. To schedule an appointment to meet with the advisor and/or for general questions pertaining to declaring a major or minor, please contact Mark Oxley, the anthropology advising coordinator.

Advising. Students interested in anthropology and/or in need of academic advising can contact the Department's Undergraduate Advising Coordinator, Mark Oxley. Students should choose an advisor from the department faculty who shares similar interests and who can help them to achieve their academic goals. Contact information for all faculty is available online. Students should contact the ACCESS Advising Center (located in the basement of Dean Hall, Room 2) for assistance planning their personal academic trajectory.

Student Grievance Procedures. Students involved in academic disputes with faculty may invoke their rights for a hearing by following procedures administered by the Office of Student Affairs. The first responsibility of the student in an academic dispute is to discuss the matter with the instructor concerned. If that does not resolve the matter, they may pursue a hearing at other levels of administration, as set out in UH Academic Policies and Procedures. A checklist for students seeking resolution of questions involving academic grievances is available here.

Courses. All of our Department faculty members teach undergraduate courses. Courses in the Anthropology Department are offered in each of the four subfields of anthropology: Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Linguistic Anthropology (see Discursive Practice). The Department offers several summer session archaeology field schools for students interested in studying archaeology. Students should also consult the UH course catalog.

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Bachelor of Arts (BA) Requirements

Students who declare/enroll in Fall 2017 and later:

Required credit hours: 37

Required courses:

  • ANTH 152: Culture and Humanity
  • ANTH 210: Archaeology (offered in Fall)
  • ANTH 215 & ANTH 215L: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (offered in Spring)
  • ANTH 490: History of Anthropology
  • Eight (8) 300 and/or 400-level anthropology courses (24 upper division credits)*

A grade of C or better in prerequisite courses is required for all courses. (A C- is not acceptable.)

*Anthropology majors may petition the anthropology undergraduate advisor to count a maximum of two (2) 300 or 400 level classes from other departments to count towards the upper division elective requirement. These courses should be related to anthropology and "fit" within the student's program of study. Approved courses cannot be used to fulfill additional major, minor or certificate requirements. Please contact the anthropology advising coordinator to request a petition form.

For general education core and graduation requirements, please refer to the University of Hawai'i Catalog.

Forms: Graduation Worksheet ("Goldenrod") form, Concurrent Degree form, Add, Drop, Credit Overload, etc.

For currently enrolled UHM students to declare a major in anthropology, students will need to fill out a 'declaration of major' form and meet with the anthropology undergraduate advisor. To schedule an appointment to meet with the advisor and/or for general questions pertaining to declaring a major, please contact the anthropology advising coordinator.

Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2017:

Required credit hours: 31

Required courses:

  • ANTH 152: Culture and Humanity
  • ANTH 210: Archaeology (offered in Fall)
  • ANTH 215 & ANTH 215L: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (offered in Spring)
  • ANTH 490: History of Anthropology
  • Six (6) 300 and/or 400-level anthropology courses (18 upper division credits)*

A grade of C or better in prerequisite courses is required for all courses. (A C- is not acceptable.)

*Anthropology majors may petition the anthropology undergraduate advisor to count a maximum of three (3) 300 or 400 level classes from other departments to count towards the upper division elective requirement. These courses should be related to anthropology and "fit" within the student's program of study. Approved courses cannot be used to fulfill additional major, minor or certificate requirements. Please contact the anthropology advising coordinator to request a petition form.

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Minor Requirements

Students interested in a minoring in anthropology should first contact Mark Oxley, the undergraduate advising coordinator, to schedule a meeting with the anthropology advisor. Minors in anthropology must complete 15 credits of upper division (300+) Anthropology courses which includes one Theory course and one Methods course. It is highly recommended that students take ANTH 300 (Contemporary Problems) to complete the Theory requirement. Alternatively, they may take any 400 level course designated as a Theory course by the Department of Anthropology. Students must also take one upper division course designated as a Methods course by the Department of Anthropology. Courses will be chosen by the student, in consultation with the undergraduate advisor, to suit the student's needs and interests. Courses must be completed with a grade of C (not C-) or better and cannot be used to fulfill any additional major, minor or certificate requirements.

The semester prior to graduation, students will need to complete a 'minor requirement form' and have it signed by the anthropology advising coordinator and the advisor for their major.

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Honors Track

The Honors Track in Anthropology is designed to provide our most talented and highly motivated students with exceptional opportunities to excel in their study of one or more of Anthropology’s subfields, including enrolling in graduate-level courses and conducting original research or implementing service learning projects with guidance from faculty members.

Students wishing to pursue the Honors Track in Anthropology must apply to, and be accepted into, the UHM Honors Program. They must complete all Honors Program requirements. In addition, students must declare Anthropology as their major and complete all requirements of the major.

Students in the Honors Track in Anthropology will benefit from smaller class sizes and more individualized attention than in regular courses. Anthropology majors will also benefit from the integrated nature of the program. Some Anthropology courses will substitute for required courses in the Honors Program. This will enable participants in the Honors Track in Anthropology to graduate with Honors without lengthening the time to completion of their degrees.

For full course requirements and offerings of the Honors Track, click here.

For further information, please contact Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez (Director, UHM Honors Program) or Alex Golub (Undergraduate Advisor, Anthropology).

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Opportunities for Practical Experience

Anthropology is a field that encourages participatory forms of study and research—in other words, it encourages you to get involved with the people and places that you are interested to learn about. Hence the program encourages community work of all kinds, including independent study, internships, and volunteer work.

  • Independent Study. Anthropology majors are encouraged to consult with faculty about opportunities for involvement with research that they direct. Look over the list of department projects and faculty and discuss your ideas with any of the faculty who share your interests. It is possible to obtain academic credit for a supervised project. See how one of the department’s undergrads arranged her own project working at the Mission Houses Museum.
  • Summer Archaeological Field Schools - The Department of Anthropology coordinates annual field schools to facilitate learning field techniques in a hands-on environment. Click here for a full listing of the current Summer Archaeological Field Schools
  • Projects - There are a number of ongoing research and community projects coordinated by both faculty and students. Click here for a full listing of current projects
  • Volunteer. Those wishing to gain experience through work with organizations in the community may pursue a variety of opportunities, including involvement with local museums, such as the Bishop Museum or the National Park Service and the various historic sites and parks that they manage in Hawai‘i.
  • Internships. The University maintains a database of paid internship opportunities. To sign up for notification of openings, register with the student internship website. Again, department faculty can advise you about organizations that may have opportunities for paid work that allows you to learn and apply your skills as an anthropologist.

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Funding

Information on sources of funding for undergraduate students in anthropology can be found here. The Department offers the Carol Eastman Scholarship for undergrads once a year. Other sources of funding can be found outside the Department and students are encouraged to contact the UH Financial Aid Office.

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Careers in Anthropology & Preparation for Advanced Studies

Are you considering a career in anthropology? Anthropology graduates with Bachelor's Degrees work in a wide range of fields within and beyond the traditional boundaries of Anthropology.

http://www.aaanet.org/profdev/careers/

A Bachelor's degree in Anthropology also positions students well for further (graduate) study in a range of fields such as Journalism, Law, Medicine, Library Science, Public Health, Social Work, Education, teaching English as a Second Language, as well as Anthropology. Generally, for a professional career as an anthropologist in a teaching, research, or museum position one additionally obtains the M.A. and/or Ph.D. degree.

Anthropology is an exciting career that can take you many places. If you are interested in exploring career opportunities in anthropology, please start by looking online.

Careers in Archaeology

Archaeology is extremely popular across the country, and archaeologists work in the private and public sector as faculty members and practitioners. You should learn about these professions and the kinds of lives that professional archaeologists live before pursuing your dream. Why not read brief autobiographies of practicing archaeologists and "Anthroplogy/Archaeology: what can I do with this degree?":

Start by reading about Careers in Archaeology:

Then go online to learn more. Here are some great resources:

Prepare yourself for a career in archaeology through coursework and practical experience at our university. Check out our course offerings!

We also have the following resources in the University of Hawai'i libraries:

  1. A video entitled, Anthropologists at Work: Careers Making a Difference (VHS 11948 & guide) at Wong Audiovisual Center, 3rd floor of Sinclair Library. This video provides a glimpse of the variety of roles that anthropologists play in modern society.
  2. Careers in Anthropology (by John Omohundro; Hamilton Reference section: GN 41.8.056 1998). This book reviews a range of anthropology specialties, and helps students decide whether anthropology is an appropriate career given their interests. It also describes the range of knowledge and abilities anthropologists use, and includes valuable discussions about how to go about becoming an anthropologist.
  3. A Guide to Careers in Physical Anthropology by Alan S. Ryan (Editor), Publisher: Bergin & Garvey ( 2001).

Undergraduate Mentoring Program

Anthropology is nothing if not built upon relationships between people.  We see ourselves as a community interwoven and held together by common interest in the study of humankind.  To that end, we foster ties with one another in part through relationships of mentoring.  Beginning in Fall 2011, the department has undertaken a pioneering undergraduate mentoring program with paid graduate student mentors.  The mentor-mentee relationship is one that is beneficial to all: undergraduates gain insights into the discipline of anthropology, as well as graduate student life; graduate students gain teaching experience and the opportunity to guide budding anthropologists to future involvement with the discipline. 

In general, mentors and mentees meet once a week. The kinds of mentoring activities may include:

  • help with course work
  • help with honor’s thesis
  • talk about graduate student research
  • attend on-campus events together (departmental colloquia, GSO conference, SPAS conference) and discuss afterward
  • attend a dissertation defense
  • discussion of how to apply to graduate school

 

At the end of each semester, mentors and mentees are required to submit a one-page assessment of their experiences.

A call for anthropology majors and minors interested in participating in this mentoring opportunity will take place at the beginning of every semester.

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Undergraduate Anthropology Student Association (AUSA)

The Undergraduate Anthropology Student Association (AUSA) is a student-led organization of Anthropology-inspired students who have an innate ambition to excel academically and make a difference within their campus community. AUSA provides fellow undergraduate Anthropology majors (and non-majors as well!) access to an incredible amount of opportunities, including but not limited to: Networking amongst undergraduates interested in Anthropology, creating new relationships, getting involved within and outside the UH campus community by participating in community service events, getting awareness regarding field school, grants, fellowships and research opportunities within the Department of Anthropology, and much more! If you are interested in becoming a part of AUSA, please feel free to contact us at AUSA@hawaii.edu and we will get you added to our mailing list!

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